Finding the Time to Train

Ask people what they want more of and you'll find time for fitness high on the list. Yet, our daily schedules don't always reflect this priority. It's easy to fill up your day with chores and tasks and look back at the end of the day and think, There was just no time. We're here to tell you there is if you know where to look. And when you make fitness a priority, even if you can uncover only 20 minutes a few times a week, you'll be pleasantly surprised to find that this time expands to fit your...

Training for an Olympic in 20 weeks

If you're looking at 20 weeks to an Olympic-distance event (see Table 10-2), you've either trained for and comfortably completed a Sprint-distance triathlon or you just like to read ahead in a book. Because an Olympic-distance triathlon is close to twice the distance of a Sprint, expect to put in twice the time in training. You'll also want to start this training with a solid fitness base. The first week of training shouldn't feel overwhelming to you. lf you feel comfortable adding speed...

In This Chapter

Deciding if you need a physical Determining how fit you are Building your support team m f you have your gear and you've decided on your event, you're probably eager to get started with your training program. But before you get going, you'll want to make an honest assessment of your fitness level for your safety and to help you gauge how far you've come by event day. In this chapter, we give you questions to ask yourself to determine whether you should visit a doctor before you start training....