Tuesday Jerk emphasis

Objectives:

1. To learn the split jerk

2. To strengthen the muscles involved in the jerk

3. To increase dynamic flexibility in the specific jerk positions

A. Split jerk

A. Split jerk

The split jerk is basically the same as the push jerk, which I already covered. The only difference is that once you jerk the bar off your shoulders you drop under the bar while doing a split (one leg forward, one leg backward).

1. Take the bar from the rack

2. Place it on your clavicle and shoulders

3. The bar is held with a clean grip or an intermediate grip

4. Hold the bar with the full hand, not just the fingertips

5. The elbows are pointed forward and down, not just down

6. The body is straight and tight

The dip:

1. Lower your body in a straight line (imagine that your back is sliding on a wall)

2. The dip is controlled, but not too slow

3. You dip into a quarter squat, no more

The explosion:

1. When you complete the dip quickly reverse your movement and explode upward!

2. You should go for a very hard push with the legs (so that the bar will leave your shoulders at the top)

3. Just as you reach the upright position, press your hands up as fast as possible

4. Try to "throw" the bar upwards, not press it

The catch:

1. You catch the bar with one leg split forward and one leg back. Experiment to see which leg forward feels more comfortable.

4. The trunk remains tight

5. The arms are immediately locked (you receive the bar with locked arms, no pressing of the weight)

The loading parameters for the split jerk are:

At first use the same load you used on the push jerk. However, as you become better at the split style you should be able to handle slightly heavier loads than in a push jerk.

The push press is best described as a "cheated" military press. You use a slight leg drive to get the bar started off the shoulders, but the arms still do most of the work. This is different than the push jerk, in which the legs do most of the work.

The loading parameters for the push press are:

Week 1:2x5 Week 2: 5 x 5 Week 3: 3 x 3, 1 x 2 Week 4: 2 x 3

You can go relatively heavy on this movement. Start with a load you would normally use on the military press and go from there. Use a weight as heavy as you can with only a slight leg drive (do not turn it into a push jerk).

The objective of this drill is to strengthen the leg muscles as well as to get you used to holding a big weight on your shoulders in preparation for a jerk. A lot of times a jerk is missed because the load feels heavy and the athlete gives up. Well, by practicing the % front squat you will get used to holding weights way heavier than you can jerk. This has a very important psychological impact on your lifting.

I recommend doing this drill in the power rack with the bar starting at the same height as the end of the dipping phase in your jerk. Be careful to keep your torso straight in this movement, we want to emulate a jerk motion as much as possible.

The loading parameters for the % front squat are:

Week 1:2x5 Week 2: 5 x 5 Week 3: 3 x 3, 1 x 2 Week 4: 2 x 3

Since this is a limited range of motion exercise you will be able to use a lot of weight on this drill. I suggest starting with your back squat max and adjusting the load from there.

This exercise is much like the preceding one, except that the load is minimal. Because of the lighter load you will be able to impart more acceleration to the bar and thus develop a different portion of the force-velocity curve. It is also a great way to increase vertical jumping ability.

Starting position:

1. Standing up with the bar on the back of your shoulders.

Execution:

2. Dip into a quarter squat and explode upward

3. Land on the ground, flex your knees to absorb the shock

The loading parameters for the bar jump squat are:

Week 1: 2x 10 Week 2: 5x 10 Week 3: 3 x 6 Week 4: 2 x 6

The following loads are appropriate:

500lbs+ squat: 55lbs 300-500lbs squat: 45lbs (bar only) 200-300lbs squat: 35lbs (smaller bar) 100-200lbs squat: 25lbs (still smaller bar)

The load is kept constant during the whole cycle. The aim is to increase jumping height, not the weight used.

Objectives:

1. To learn the proper clean sequence

2. To strengthen the muscles involved in the clean

3. To increase dynamic flexibility in the specific clean positions

A. Half-squat clean from the floor

A. Half-squat clean from the floor

This is much like the half-squat snatch in that it uses the same lifting sequence as during a competitive full squat clean. Once again, you lift the load under control up to the knees, then, explode! Catch the bar in a half-squat to get used to going under the bar.

Starting position:

1. Feet are hip width, toes are turned slightly outward

2. Legs are flexed at the knees slightly (around 100-120 degrees)

3. Trunk is flexed, back is tightly arched

4. Shoulders are in front of the bar

5. Arms are straight

6. Traps are stretched

7. Head is looking forward

Pull:

1. From the ground to the knees lift the bar under control while keeping a stable torso angle.

2. At the knees explode upward with a powerful leg and back extension

3. The bar should be kept close to the body at all times

4. The traps contract forcefully to further accelerate the bar

1. Catch the bar in a half-squat

2. Catch the bar on your shoulders and whip your arms around so that the elbows are pointing forward, not down

The loading parameters for the half-squat clean from the floor are as follows:

Note: You may have noticed that I did not give a percentage or load to use. Well, since most of you have never performed a clean before, it would be pretty pointless to use percentages to plan your training load! But after the first phase of training you should have a good idea of the weight you can handle. Start with a load equivalent to what you used on the power clean from the blocks

B. Clean pull

The clean pull is the logical progression from the clean-grip deadlift. Ideally, you want to use the exact same pulling motion as during the half-squat snatch. Concentrate on rising up on the toes and contracting the traps at the same time.

The loading parameters for the snatch pull are as follows:

The biggest difference between a Romanian deadlift and other deadlifts is that the starting position is the other deadlifts' completed position; standing fully upright. From that position you will lower the bar with a knee flexion and trunk flexion then bring it back up for a complete rep.

Start position: Feet are hip width, toes are pointing straight forward. The grip is narrow (approximately shoulder width). Legs are very slightly bent and the torso is fully extended. Back is tightly arched. Shoulders are back (beach position). Arms are straight, traps are stretched. Head is looking forward.

Lowering: Lower the bar until it's 2-3" below the knees. The knees only bend slightly more than in the starting position, the back becomes parallel to the ground and the hips are brought back. Back stays tight. The arms stay long.

Pull: Bring the bar back up in the reverse of the way you lowered it; mostly through trunk extension with a slight extension of the knees. Back stays tight. The arms stay long. The lift is completed when you are standing up completely.

The loading parameters for the Romanian deadlift are:

Week 1:2x5 Week 2: 5 x 5 Week 3: 3 x 3, 1 x 2 Week 4: 2 x 3

This consists of a partial deadlift with the bar starting at, or slightly above the knees. You can use really heavy weights for this exercise, which will do wonders for your dynamic lower back strength and isometric trap and back strength. For competitive powerlifters this can really help develop a strong lock out.

Start position: The bar is set on pins (or blocks) so that it's at knee level, or slightly above. Feet are hip width, toes are turned slightly outward. The grip is narrow (approximately shoulder width). Legs are slightly bent. Trunk is flexed, back is tightly arched. Shoulders are in front of the bar. Arms are straight, traps are stretched. Head is looking forward.

Pull: From the pins up to the standing position the bar is lifted with a combined back extension and knee extension. Back stays tight. The arms stay long. The lift is completed when you are standing up completely.

The loading parameters for the 1/2 deadlift are:

Week 1:2x5 Week 2: 5 x 5 Week 3: 3 x 3, 1 x 2 Week 4: 2 x 3

Objective:

1. General strengthening of the muscles involved in the Olympic lifts

A. Bench press

This exercise will increase your triceps and shoulder strength, which is very useful while holding heavy jerks or snatches.

I trust that you already know how to perform this movement as it's fairly common in most gyms, so I won't go into more details about proper form.

The loading parameters for the bench press are:

Week 1:2x5 Week 2: 5 x 5 Week 3: 3 x 3, 1 x 2 Week 4: 3 x 3

WT r

Use heavy weights for this exercise, but do not cut your range of motion short. Touch the chest and explode upwards!

The military press is another great triceps and shoulder strengthening exercise. A proper military press is executed with straight legs and no cheating to get the bar up. Like other overhead lifts, the military press is also a great way to develop the stabilizing capacities of the trunk muscles. Once again, no need to describe this exercise in detail, as it's a fixture in most gyms.

The loading parameters for the military press are:

Week 1:2x5 Week 2: 5 x 5 Week 3: 3 x 5 Week 4: 2 x 3

C. Zottman curl

You curl the weight with the palms up and lower it with the palms down, making the muscle work hard on both the concentric and eccentric portion of the movement. This drill will strengthen all of the arm flexor muscles. Although not of capital importance in Olympic lifting, the fact is that a chain will always break at its weakest link.

The loading parameters for the Zottman curl are:

Week 1:2x5 Week 2: 5 x 5 Week 3: 3 x 5 Week 4: 2 x 5

D. Front squat

D. Front squat

The front squat is a fantastic quad and glute builder. It also has the added benefit of preparing you to catch a full squat clean.

I always advocate going as low as possible as long as the heels can be kept on the ground and the lower back stays arched.

Starting position:

1. Stand up, bar on the clavicle, elbows are high

2. The feet are shoulder width and pointing slightly outward

3. The chest is out and the head is looking forward

Squat down:

1. Squat down under control

2. Keep the trunk upright during the whole movement

3. Keep the upper back and lower back tight

4. Go as low as possible while maintaining proper form

1. Do not pause in the bottom position, immediately stand up

2. Try to accelerate the bar as you are standing up

3. Avoid bending forward, use your legs to stand up, not your back

The loading parameters for the front squat are:

Week 1:2x5 Week 2: 5 x 5 Week 3: 3 x 3, 1 x 2 Week 4: 3 x 3

You can try to lift big weights in the front squat, but you must do so while maintaining proper form and going low. This will give you a lot of confidence for when you are ready to do full squat cleans.

Turbo Charged Fitness With The Tabata System

Turbo Charged Fitness With The Tabata System

The Tabata workout system is a version of the High Intensity Interval Training program developed by Professor Izumi Tabata as training for Olympic speed skaters in 1996. The results studies conducted on the training program confirm that even a four minute cardiovascular exercise routine improves a persons level of fitness.

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