Tuesday Jerk emphasis

Objectives:

1. To learn the split jerk

2. To strengthen the muscles involved in the jerk

3. To increase technical mastery of the jerk

You will now use this exercise before the jerk so that it will have its maximal psychological benefit on the jerk. Once again, be careful to keep your torso straight in this movement, we want to emulate a jerk motion as much as possible.

The loading parameters for the XA front squat are:

Week 1: 2x3 Week 2: 5 x 3 Week 3: 3 x 3, 1 x 2 Week 4: 2 x 2

B. Split jerk

The split jerk is basically the same as the push jerk, which I already covered. The only difference is that once you jerk the bar off your shoulders you drop under the bar while doing a split (one leg forward, one leg backward).

Starting position:

1. Take the bar from the rack

2. Place it on your clavicle and shoulders

3. The bar is held with a clean grip or an intermediate grip

4. Hold the bar with the full hand, not just the fingertips

5. The elbows are pointed forward and down, not just down

6. The body is straight and tight

The dip:

1. Lower your body in a straight line (imagine that your back is sliding on a wall)

2. The dip is controlled, but not too slow

3. You dip into a quarter squat, no more

The explosion:

1. When you complete the dip quickly reverse your movement and explode upward!

2. You should go for a very hard push with the legs (so that the bar will leave your shoulders at the top)

3. Just as you reach the upright position, press your hands up as fast as possible

4. Try to "throw" the bar upwards, not press it

The catch:

1. You catch the bar with one leg split forward and one leg back. Experiment to see which leg forward feels most comfortable.

6. The trunk remains tight

7. The arms are immediately locked (you receive the bar with locked arms, no pressing of the weight)

The loading parameters for the split jerk are:

Week 1: 2x3, 2 x 2 Week 2: 2 x 3, 3 x 2, 1 x 1 Week 3: 1 x 3, 1 x 2, 2 x 1 Week 4: 3 x 2

C. Push jerk

C. Push jerk

Adding the push jerk to this phase of training completes the turn from a strength-dominant workout to a power-dominant workout. Expect great gains in overhead movements from now on!

Starting position:

1. Take the bar from the rack

2. Place it on your clavicle and shoulders

3. The bar is held with a clean grip or an intermediate grip

4. Hold the bar with the full hand, not just the fingertips

5. The elbows are pointed forward and down, not just down

6. The body is straight and tight

The dip:

1. Lower your body in a straight line (imagine that your back is sliding on a wall)

2. The dip is controlled, but not too slow

3. You dip into a quarter squat, no more

The explosion:

1. When you complete the dip quickly reverse your movement and explode upward!

2. You should go for a very hard push with the legs (so that the bar will leave your shoulders at the top)

3. Just as you reach the upright position, press your hands up as fast as possible

4. Try to "throw" the bar upwards, not press it

The catch:

1. Catch the bar with a slight squat under the bar

2. The trunk remains tight

3. The arms are immediately locked (you receive the bar with locked arms, no pressing of the weight)

The loading parameters for the push jerk are:

Week 1: 2x3, 2 x 2 Week 2: 2 x 3, 1 x 2, 1 x 1 Week 3: 1 x 3, 1 x 2, 1 x 1 Week 4: 3 x 2

We will keep this fine power movement to ensure that you keep a high power production potential during this phase of training.

Starting position:

1. Standing up with the bar on the back of your shoulders.

Execution:

1. Dip into a quarter squat and explode upward

2. Land on the ground, flex your knees to absorb the shock

The loading parameters for the loaded jump squat are:

Week 1: 2x 10 Week 2: 5x 10 Week 3: 3 x 6 Week 4: 2 x 6

The following loads are appropriate:

500lbs+ squat: 55lbs 300-500lbs squat: 45lbs (bar only) 200-300lbs squat: 35lbs (smaller bar) 100-200lbs squat: 25lbs (still smaller bar)

The load is kept constant during the whole cycle. The aim is to increase jumping height, not the weight used.

Objectives:

1. To learn the proper clean sequence

2. To strengthen the muscles involved in the clean

3. To increase technical mastery of the clean

A. Half-squat clean from the floor

This is much like the half-squat snatch in that it uses the same lifting sequence as during a competitive full squat clean. Once again, you lift the load under control up to the knees then explode! Catch the bar in a half-squat to get used to going under the bar.

Starting position:

1. Feet are hip width, toes are turned slightly outward

2. Legs are flexed at the knees slightly (around 100-120 degrees)

3. Trunk is flexed, back is tightly arched

4. Shoulders are in front of the bar

5. Arms are straight

6. Traps are stretched

7. Head is looking forward

Pull:

1. From the ground to the knees lift the bar under control while keeping a stable torso angle.

2. At the knees explode upward with a powerful leg and back extension

3. The bar should be kept close to the body at all times

4. The traps contract forcefully to further accelerate the bar

Catch:

1. Catch the bar in a half-squat

2. Catch the bar on your shoulders and whip your arms around so that the elbows are pointing forward, not down

Week 1: 2x3, 2 x 2 Week 2: 2 x 3, 2 x 2, 1 x 1 Week 3: 1 x 3, 1 x 2, 2 x 1, Week 4: 2 x 2

Note: You may have noticed that I did not give a percentage or load to use. Well, since most of you have never performed a clean before, it would be pretty pointless to use percentages to plan your training load! But after the first and second phases of training you should have a good idea of the weight you can handle.

B. Full squat clean from floor

B. Full squat clean from floor

We follow the same logic with the full squat clean as we did for the full squat snatch. You now must combine a powerful pull with a fast drop and catch under the bar. The key is to keep the torso solid as you catch the bar in the full squat position. Just like the full squat snatch, start with the same weight as you used for the half-squat snatch. With practice you will be able to handle 10-20% more weight in this exercise.

The loading parameters for the half-squat clean from the floor are as follows:

Week 1: 2x3, 2 x 2 Week 2: 2 x 3, 2 x 2, 1 x 1 Week 3: 1 x 3, 1 x 2, 2 x 1, Week 4: 2 x 2

C. Clean pull

The clean pull is the logical progression from the clean-grip deadlift. Ideally, you want to use the exact same pulling motion as during the half-squat snatch. Concentrate on rising up on the toes and contracting the traps at the same time.

The loading parameters for the snatch pull are as follows:

Week 1: 2x4, 2 x 3 Week 2: 3 x 4, 3 x 3, 1 x 2 Week 3: 1 x 3, 1 x 2, 1 x 1 Week 4: 3 x 2

D. Front squat

D. Front squat

You will now use two squat exercises per week to fine tune your leg strength and develop a certain comfort in the full squat clean position.

The loading parameters for the front squat are:

Week 1:2x5 Week 2: 5 x 5 Week 3: 3 x 3. 1 x 2 Week 4: 2 x 3

Turbo Charged Fitness With The Tabata System

Turbo Charged Fitness With The Tabata System

The Tabata workout system is a version of the High Intensity Interval Training program developed by Professor Izumi Tabata as training for Olympic speed skaters in 1996. The results studies conducted on the training program confirm that even a four minute cardiovascular exercise routine improves a persons level of fitness.

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