History

The invention of specific adjustment technique (SAT) was most likely coincidental. During a flu epidemic in the 1950s, the osteopath and chiropractor Parnall Bradbury happened to be the only therapist on call in his clinic. Because of the enormous number of patients in need of treatment, Bradbury had only limited time for each treatment. Thus, he decided to only manipulate the most conspicuous segment in each patient.

His success was so great that he further analyzed this method. Particularly effective were those treatments in which he manipulated the atypical vertebrae. Parnall Bradbury was Littlejohn's student and was therefore familiar with his model of force lines. In his chiropractic training, he had learned the "whole-in-one manipulation of the upper CSC." Incidentally, the treatment of one segment, of the key lesion, followed Still's principle to "find it, fix it, and leave it alone."

Together with the physician Dudley Tee, he completed a series of investigations to analyze the effectiveness of manipulating key lesions and introduced this method in his book Spinology. Herein, he defined the term for "positional lesions." This refers mostly to traumatic blockages of atypical vertebrae, such as in whiplash injuries. According to Bradbury, this vertebra has to be repositioned with an impulse technique, in which the impulse is exactly opposite the force vector that caused the blockage. This method was developed further and refined by Bradbury's student Tom Dummer. It is not only applied in traumatic lesions.

Occiput

T3/4 balance point of the triangles

L3 tip of the lower triangle

Occiput

T3/4 balance point of the triangles

L3 tip of the lower triangle

skull base

A front edge of the occipital foramen magnum

B.C to the side of the back edge of the occipital foramen magnum A-CB anteroposterior line B-H posteroanterior line C-H posteroanterior line H hip joint CB coccygeal bone

Fig. 5.7a, b a Littlejohn's model. Inter-curve pivots are C5, T9, and L5. atypical vertebrae are C1, C2, and L5/S1. b Polygon of forces according to Littlejohn, demonstrating the mechanical relations and functions of the spine.

Depending on the localization of the "primary lesion" (cervical or sacral), the therapist follows a certain order in the manipulation of key segments, manipulating only one segment in each treatment.

31 Days To Bigger Arms

31 Days To Bigger Arms

You can have significantly bigger arms in only 31 days. How much bigger? That depends on a lot of factors. You werent able to select your parents so youre stuck with your genetic potential to build muscles. You may have a good potential or you may be like may of the rest of us who have averages Potential. Download this great free ebook and start learns how to build your muscles up.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment