Biomechanics of the Craniosacral System

Falx And Ligaments Within The Skull

The theory of the craniosacral mechanism is based on five elements 1. The motility of the nervous system 2. The fluctuation of the cerebrospinal fluid CSF 3. The reciprocal tension membranes falx, tentorium Fig. 4.2 , and dura mater 4. The mobility of the cranial bones 5. The arbitrary mobility of the sacrum between the ilia We do not want to present these five components of craniosacral therapy in detail here, but instead refer the reader to the relevant literature. Nevertheless, for the sake...

The Zink Patterns40418182

Gordon Zink Pattern

Gordon Zink, American osteopath and longstanding docent in the department of osteopathy at Des Moines University, Iowa, devoted much of his life to studying the fasciae as well as the effects of fascial imbalances on posture and circulation. Thanks to Michael Kuchera continuing education course, May 2004 in Berlin , who had the good fortune of working with Zink, the latter became known towards the end of his career as an osteopath with short treatments and fast results. He had developed a...

Classification of the Five Muscle Chains

Deep Anterior Chain Muscles

The five muscle chains of each half of the body are composed as follows Three fundamental or vertical muscle chains involving the head and trunk. Two complementary or horizontal chains that concern the upper and lower extremities. These are relational chains that relate the person to their surroundings. These five muscle chains correspond to five psychological constitutions that are likewise categorized into three fundamental and two complementary constitutions. Interestingly, Struyff-Denys...

Myofascial Chains According to Busquet

Muscle Chains

Busquet describes five chains on the trunk that run into the extremities Flexion chain or straight anterior chain Extension chain or straight posterior chain Diagonal posterior chain or opening chain Diagonal anterior chain or closing chain The Static Posterior Chain Fig. 2.11 When standing, gravity tends to top the upper body forward. The body counteracts this with two passive that is, using little energy mechanisms. These are, on the one hand, the pleural and peritoneal spaces that exert an...

Muscles of Upper Torso Pain

Sternocostal Pain

Pectoralis Major Muscle Fig. 19.70 - lateral at the manubrium and body of the sternum - aponeurosis of the abdominal external oblique muscle Crest of the lesser tubercle of the humerus Deltoid tuberosity ventral Clavicular part flexion, adduction in the shoulder joint Sternocostal part adduction and internal rotation in the shoulder joint, inhalatory muscle Trigger points are distributed throughout the entire muscle. The points that are located more laterally and closer to the armpit are...

Muscles of Hip Thigh and Knee Pain

Inguinal Ligament Pain

Tensor Fasciae Latae Muscle Fig. 19.106 Origin Iliac crest between the iliac tubercle and the ASiS outside Through the iliotibial tract to the front side of the lateral condyle of the tibia Stabilizing the knee in extension Superior gluteal nerve L4-S1 Trigger Point Location At the front edge of the muscle in the proximal third Anterolateral thigh, possibly all the way to the knee Sartorius Muscle Figs. 19.107,19.108 Origin Tibial tuberosity, medial edge Action Flexion in the hipjoint Abduction...

Muscles of Head and Neck Pain

Mastoid Pain

With active trigger points TP , the muscles in this section lead to pain in the head and neck region, which could be misinterpreted as one of the following Arthrosis of the temporomandibular joint Trapezius Muscle Figs. 19.1,19.2,19.3,19.4 Middle third of the superior nuchal line Spinous processes and supraspinous ligament up to T12. Outer third of the back border of the clavicle Medial section of the acromion Upper border of the spine of the scapula Outward rotation in the shoulder joint...

Myofascial Chains According to T Myers

Myers Muscle Chains

The Superficial Back Line Fig. 2.6 Fig. 2.6 Myofascial chains according to Myers. Superficial back line. Fig. 2.6 Myofascial chains according to Myers. Superficial back line. The Superficial Front Line Fig. 2.7a Anterior compartment muscles Infrapatellar and quadriceps tendons Sternalis and pectoralis major Sole of the foot and peroneal muscle Tractus iliotibialis, TFL, and gluteus maximus Obliquii and quadratus lumborum muscles Rhomboideus and serratus anterior on the other side TFL and...