BreakIn Program

Alwyn wants everyone to do this program for at least two weeks before advancing to the regular routines. Yes, that includes you, even if you're so buff you just won your neighborhood's Mr. Cul-de-Sac trophy for the third year in a row.

He says that for two reasons: First, the programs in the following chapters are complex, and you need some amount of muscular endurance to perform them effectively. Second, many lifters today have never actually gone through a basic, balanced, total-body program. Alwyn and I and every other trainer in America can tell you stories about guys who walk into the gym for the first time with programs they ripped out of Muscle & Fitness and start off doing fifteen sets of biceps curls and another fifteen sets of triceps extensions.

Hell, look at me: I lifted for a quarter-century before I did my first set of dead-lifts and second set of squats. (As I said in Chapter 8, the first set of squats didn't go very well.)

So, no matter your muscle mass, regardless of your reputation, do this Break-In program for four weeks if you're a beginner, and at least two weeks if you're advanced.

Some definitions:

Beginner

I don't necessarily mean a beginner beginner—as in, you're really trying to lift for the first time. If you've never lifted for more than a few months without stopping and you haven't been on any program for more than a month, consider yourself a beginner.

Do each of the two workouts once a week, with as much time in between as your schedule allows. (Monday and Thursday is perfect, but if you have to do it more erratically, no sweat. Just make sure there's at least one day between workouts.)

Intermediate

We define an intermediate as a guy who has, at some point, lifted for at least a year without taking a substantial break (longer than two or three weeks). Be smart about this: You know if you've lifted long enough to get the hang of it. You should be able to say you've tried a variety of exercises and have seen measurable progress, both in terms of strength and exercise performance and in what you see in the mirror. Physical changes—bigger muscles, smaller waist—are a pretty good indicator that your body has made some physiological adaptations, and you're thus a true intermediate.

Do each workout four or five times, alternating between the A and B programs, with at least one day of rest in between each. Ideally, you'll do three workouts a week (Monday, Wednesday, Friday, for example) for three weeks. That's nine total workouts, so to make sure you do both workouts an equal number of times, you'd do the tenth and final Break-In workout on Monday of the fourth week. Then you'd take the rest of the fourth week off before diving into one of the other programs.

Alternately, you could do the workouts four times each, ending the program on Monday of the third week.

Advanced

We all think we're advanced, but few of us really are. An advanced lifter should be able to say he's lifted for years without a serious break and that those years were both consecutive and adjacent to the current one.

A test of whether you're truly advanced: If you make all the adjustments you're going to make to a new workout program within two weeks, you're advanced.

Do each workout twice a week for two weeks (two days on, one off, two on, two off) before jumping into the Strength or Hypertrophy programs.

Break-In Workout A

Exercise

Sets

Reps

Tempo

Rest

Squat (p. 96)

2

15

Normal

60

Superset with full rest

Static lunge (p. 123)

2

15*

Normal

60

Two-point dumbbell row with elbow out (p. 158)

2

15*

Normal

60

Superset with full rest

Push-up (p. 135)

2

15

Normal

60

Swiss-ball crunch (p. 169)

2

20

Normal

60

*each leg or arm

Break-In Workout B

Exercise

Sets

Reps

Tempo

Rest

Deadlift (p. 106)

2

15

Normal

60

Superset with full rest

Step-up (p. 126)

2

15*

Normal

60

Dumbbell one-arm shoulder press (p. 143)

2

15*

Normal

60

Superset with full rest

Close-grip lat pulldown (p. 152)

2

15

Normal

60

Reverse crunch (p. 172)

2

20

Normal

60

*each leg or arm

Spartans Routine

Spartans Routine

Fitness is the biggest issue of todays society because technology has improvised our lives so much that people do not move a lot and this lazy working routine and tiring mind works make people unfit physically.

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