Rev

I have a '68 Dart 270 Hardtop with a swapped-in 340 and a 727. The car is a hot rod with a mildly built engine. The engine was fully rebuilt by my dad to mostly stock specifications. I drive my Dart regularly on the streets. On one of those days, something happened that makes me need to write this letter.

I was out enjoying an evening drive outside of Fresno, California, and my cousin in his car joined me. We happened to line up at a deserted intersection, and decided to let it rip. I pulled the shifter down to low gear to get ready. I pulled hard through first gear, and then the linkage bound on me and it wouldn't let me shift. Before I could react, the tach was buried and the engine was popping.

I couldn't believe what happened. The engine seemed to idle rough as it settled down. I decided it was time to head for home, and hoped that it would just clear out, but no such luck. At idle the engine sounds like it is running on six cylinders. I need to fix my engine but do not know for sure what is wrong with it. I know it got over-revved, but I'm not sure what parts got hurt. Do you think the rods are ruined? The oil pressure is still good. Where do I start in trying to fix my engine?

Chad Long

Via moparmusclemagazine

Chad, something like that happening can really ruin a good time. There is no denying that over-revving an engine can lead to damage, but if there is any consolation, at least be thankful that a connecting rod or piston did not let go and destroy your engine. Since the engine is missing, it would tend to indicate a loss of compression in one or more of the cylinders. The place to start the diagnosis is with a compression test to identify which, if any of the cylinders are down. An even better evaluation can be achieved with a leak-down tester. This tool applies air pressure to the cylinder and

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