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68-70 B-Body Door Handles. Chrome $71 pr

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TECH:

Blowers don't just intimidate with their looks and sound, they back it up with massive horsepower and torque. This month we'll show you the different types of supercharging so you can decide if one is right for your Mopar.

Blowers don't just intimidate with their looks and sound, they back it up with massive horsepower and torque. This month we'll show you the different types of supercharging so you can decide if one is right for your Mopar.

ROOTS-STYLE, SCREW-TYPE, AND CENTRIFUGAL SUPERCHARGERS OFFER THREE WAYS TO SUPERCHARGE YOUR MOPAR

TEXT: DAVE YOUNG PHOTOS: DAVE YOUNG, RANDY BOLIG, KEVIN DIOSSI, PHIL HUBBARD, AND COURTESY OF THE MANUFACTURERS

|here are some decisions we Imake in life that have no bad outcome. Like visiting the ice cream store, no matter what flavor you choose, you're still having ice cream. Similarly, there are choices we make when building our Mopars, but whether Hemi, big-block, or small-block, A-, B-, C-, E-, or F-body, the end result is still a Mopar so there's really no bad choice. The same goes for supercharging the engine in your Mopar. Regardless of which style you choose, Roots, Screw-Type, or Centrifugal supercharger, you'll still be force-feeding air and fuel into your engine for incredible power gains.

When it comes to power, the secret of supercharging has been out for a long time. In fact, most supercharger designs predate the invention of automobiles altogether. As an example, the Roots supercharger design can be traced to the American brothers Francis and Philander Roots, who came up with the design in 1854 as they attempted to improve the design of the waterwheel powering their textile mill. Though their bi-rotor gear pump didn't work very well at the water mill, the brothers later found it to be great at pumping large volumes of air. Before being adapted to automotive applications, Roots and other styles of superchargers were used in a variety of industrial applications, including blowing fresh air down mine shafts.

The first application of a blower being fitted to an internal combustion engine is arguably when Sir Dugald Clerk used one on his two-stroke engine design in 1901, forcing air into the engine in an attempt to lower the inlet air temperature. While compressing air actually raises the inlet temperature, he did discover that he increased power by some six percent using forced induction. Since then, superchargers of many types have been designed and used to force air into internal combustion engines with varying levels of success, and through that process modern superchargers have evolved into one of three basic designs. Today, nearly

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