Crewtype Supercharge

Screw-type superchargers look similar to Roots units, but actually perform much differently. The Mr. Norm's race team uses a Kenne Bell supercharger on their modern Hemi to run some impressive mid-nine second elapsed times in the quarter.

Screw-type superchargers have very high efficiency ratings, but are somewhat more complex to manufacture than Roots or centrifugal blowers.

Screw-type superchargers look similar to Roots units, but actually perform much differently. The Mr. Norm's race team uses a Kenne Bell supercharger on their modern Hemi to run some impressive mid-nine second elapsed times in the quarter.

Screw-type superchargers have very high efficiency ratings, but are somewhat more complex to manufacture than Roots or centrifugal blowers.

With the rear air-inlet plate removed, you can see the male and female intermeshing rotors inside the screw-type supercharger.

Whatever style blower you choose, it will be driven by the crankshaft by either a belt or gear drive. Street systems normally utilize a serpentine belt, often shared with the rest of the accessories, while high-boost units need a cogged belt to prevent slippage.

Kenne-Bell already has screw-type supercharger kits available for the 5.7 and 6.1 modern Hemi engines, enhancing an already potent platform.

The technology behind supercharging can't all be covered in one magazine article, so if you want to learn more check out The Complete Guide to Street Supercharging by efficiency. By design, the screw-type blower both moves air forward along the rotors as a positive displacement pump, and also acts as a vane supercharger, further compressing the air as it moves it. This combination of air compression gives screw-type superchargers higher efficiency ratings, and lower inlet air temps, especially at high boost levels, when compared to Roots blowers.

Years ago, the complicated machining required to fabricate the rotors of a twin-screw compressor restricted the design to industrial applications, but thanks to CNC machining the cost to manufacture these parts have dropped significantly. Kenne Bell, Whipple, and Vortech-Lysholm are all producing screw-type superchargers and supercharger kits for modern and classic cars, including Mopars. Twin-screw systems generally give more hood clearance than Roots superchargers, as air can enter at the rear instead of the top. The screw-type supercharger also needs less maintenance than the Roots, since no Teflon seals are required on the rotors, making it a great choice for your Mopar. MM

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