The original USDA Food Guide Pyramid

The first food pyramid was created by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) in 1992 in response to criticism that the previous government guide to food choices the Four Food Group Plan (vegetables and fruits, breads and cereals, milk and milk products, meat and meat alternatives) was too heavily weighted toward high-fat, high-cholesterol foods from animals. Figure 17-1 depicts the original USDA Food Guide Pyramid. As you can see, this pyramid is based on daily food choices, showing you...

You have high blood pressure

In 1997, when researchers at Johns Hopkins analyzed the results of more than 30 studies dealing with high blood pressure, they found that people taking daily supplements of 2,500 mg (2.5 grams) of potassium were likely to have blood pressure several points lower than people not taking the supplements. Ask your doctor about this one, and remember Food is also a good source of potassium. One whole banana has up to 470 milligrams of potassium, one cup of dates 1,160 milligrams, and one cup of...

Using supplements as insurance

Healthy people who eat a nutritious diet still may want to use supplements to make sure they're getting adequate nutrition. Plenty of recent research supports their choice. Taking supplements may reduce the likelihood of some types of cancer and other diseases. After analyzing data from a survey of 871 men and women, epidemiologists at Seattle's Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center found that people taking a daily multivitamin for more than ten years were 50 percent less likely to develop colon...

How much fiber do you need

Department of Agriculture, the average American woman gets about 12 grams of fiber a day from food the average American man, 17 grams. Those figures are well below the new IOM (Institute of Medicine) recommendations that I conveniently list here I 25 grams a day for women younger than 50 I 38 grams a day for men younger than 50 I 21 grams a day for women older than 50 I 30 grams a day for men older than 50 The amounts of dietary fiber recommended by IOM are believed to...

Determining the Safety of Food Additives

The safety of any chemical approved for use as a food additive is based on whether it is Some preservatives are double-edged good and not-so-good at the same time. For example, nitrates and nitrites are effective preservatives that prevent the growth of disease-bearing organisms in cured meat. But when they reach your stomach, nitrates and nitrites react with natural ammonia compounds called amines to form nitrosamines, substances known to cause cancer in animals fed amounts of nitrosamines...

When Your Appetite Goes Haywire Eating Disorders

An eating disorder is a psychological illness that leads you to eat either too much or too little. Indulging in a hot fudge sundae once in a while is not an eating disorder. Neither is dieting for three weeks so that you can fit into last year's dress this New Year's Eve. The difference between normal indulgence and normal dieting to lose weight versus an eating disorder is that the first two are acceptable, healthy behavior while an eating disorder is a potentially life-threatening illness...

The brand new 2005 USDA Food Guide Pyramid

By the time USDA HHS got around to revising the Dietary Guidelines for 2005, it was pretty clear that the original food pyramid hadn't done its proposed job of teaching most Americans how to choose foods that provide sufficient nutrients without piling on the pounds. What to do What else In a word, MyPyramid (see Figure 17-2). MyPyramid image promotes both proper MyPyramid image promotes both proper Courtesy of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Like the original Food Guide...