Power squats

Rectus abdominis, under the aponeurosis

Internal oblique, under the aponeurosis

Iliopsoas

Pubic symphysis

Pectineus

Quadriceps, rectus femoris

Sartorius

Adductor longus

Quadriceps, vastus medialis

Meniscus Gracilis

Gastrocnemius, medial head Tibia, medial surface Soleus

Peroneus Brevis StretchingFascia Lata

External oblique Gluteus medius Anterior superior Iliac spine Tensor fascia lata Greater trochanter Gluteus maximus Pyramidalis, under the aponeurosis Fascia lata, Iliotiblal band Quadriceps, vastus lateralis Quadriceps, vastus intermedius Head of fibula Patella

Patellar ligament Peroneus longus Tibialis anterior

Extensor digitorum longus Peroneus brevls

This movement is performed the same as the classic squat, except that the legs are farther apart and the toes point out, which works the Inner thigh intensely.

The working muscles are as follows:

• quadriceps

• adductor muscle group (adductor magnus, adductor longus, adductor brevis, adductor pectineus, and gracilis)

gluteal muscles

• hamstrings

abdominal muscles

• lumbosacral muscle group

Power Squats
THREE FEET POSITIONS FOR SQUATS

Muscles used extensively ^^^H Muscles used 1

Medial Sural Cutaneous Nerve

Greater sciatic notch

Lateral calcaneal branch Lateral dorsal cutaneous nerve

Tibial nerve, Plantar nerves.

Medial calcaneal branches

SCIATIC NERVE AND POSTERIOR CUTANEOUS NERVE OF THIGH

Greater sciatic notch

Sciatic nerve, L4-L5-S1-S2-S3

Posterior cutaneous nerve of the thigh, S1-S2-S3

Common peroneal segment of sciatic nerve

Posterior cutaneous nerve of the thigh, S1-S2-S3

Common peroneal segment of sciatic nerve

Common peroneal nerve Articular branch Tibial nerve

Gastrocnemius-

Common peroneal nerve Articular branch Tibial nerve

Lateral sural cutaneous nerve

Peroneal communicating branch

Tibial nerve, Plantar nerves.

Medial calcaneal branches

Lateral calcaneal branch Lateral dorsal cutaneous nerve

SCIATIC NERVE AND POSTERIOR CUTANEOUS NERVE OF THIGH

Disc herniation is a relatively frequent Injury in weightlifting, most often caused by incorrect back position during the squat, deadlift, or bent row.

When executing these exercises, the main thing to avoid is rounding the back (vertebral flexion), which expands the back of the disc and pinches the front of it.

If the intervertebral disc is cracked or aging, the gelatinous liquid of the nucleus pulposus migrates backward and can compress on the spinal cord or the roots of the spinal nerves. Symptoms depend on the type of lesion, the amount of nucleus pulposus pushed out, and the surface that is compressed. The nucleus pulposus can bulge or, worse, explode through the annulus fibrosus, which surrounds it, and sometimes tear the posterior ligament that connects the vertebrae to each other. Compression of the neural elements caused by the tearing of the annulus fibrosus Is particularly painful and incapacitating.

In weight training, herniations usually occur at the lumbar level and most frequently between the third and fourth or between the fourth and fifth lumbar vertebrae. The pain is dull and deep, sometimes accompanied by swelling and tingling. The pain is located in the middle of the back or more often to one side, radiating to the gluteal muscles, pelvis, and pubis and down the leg following the path of the sciatic nerve (hence the name sciatica to define this type of pain). Generally, disc herniations are spontaneously reabsorbed, and the pain eventually disappears. But in some cases, the bulge in the disc does not disappear and continues to press painfully against the nerves, or a detached piece of intervertebral cartilage compresses the neural elements. In both these cases, a surgeon can remove the part that is pressing against the nerves. To prevent disc herniation, use proper form when performing risky exercises such as the squat, deadlift, good morning, and bent row.

No matter what the exercise, as soon as heavy weights are involved, it is essential to create a "block."

1. Expanding the chest and holding a deep breath fills the lungs, which supports the rib cage and prevents the chest from collapsing forward.

2. Contracting the abdominal muscle group supports the core and increases the intra-abdominal pressure, which prevents the torso from collapsing forward.

3. Finally, arching the low back by contracting the lumbar muscles positions the spinal column in extension. These three actions together are referred to as blocking, which keeps you from rounding the back (vertebral flexion). A rounded back when lifting heavy weights can cause a herniated disc.

To prevent injury at the lumbar level, never round the back when executing a deadlift or squat.

DISC HERNIATION _

Herniated Disc Vertebral Column

Vertebral flexion using weights can cause a herniated disc, usually in the lumbar vertebrae. These herniations occur most frequently with the squat and deadlift, and most often are the result of incorrect back position because of bad technique.

process

Spinous Articular process process process

Spinous Articular process process

Vertebral flexion using weights can cause a herniated disc, usually in the lumbar vertebrae. These herniations occur most frequently with the squat and deadlift, and most often are the result of incorrect back position because of bad technique.

Intervertebral

DISC HERNIATION _

fibrosus Nucleus pulposus

EFFECT OF AGE ON DISC HERNIATION LUMBAR VERTEBRAL SEGMENT (CUT)

Annulus fibrosus Vertebral body

Cartilaginous covering

Articular Segment

Superior articular process

Pedicle of the vertebral arch

Spinous process Inferior articular process

|T] Young vertebral segment [2]

The intervertebral disc is still healthy.

Comment: After a heavy workout, stretch the back by hanging from a chinning bar and focusing on relaxing the body. This allows the muscles to relax and rebalance the pressures inside the intervertebral discs.

EFFECT OF AGE ON DISC HERNIATION LUMBAR VERTEBRAL SEGMENT (CUT)

|T] Young vertebral segment [2]

The intervertebral disc is still healthy.

Older vertebral segment

With age, the annulus fibrosus begins to develop fissures and the viscous gel of the nucleus pulposus begins to dehydrate. The intervertebral disc collapses and the vertebral segments lose their mobility.

Annulus fibrosus Vertebral body

Cartilaginous covering

Superior articular process

Pedicle of the vertebral arch

Spinous process Inferior articular process

From the age of 30, the intervertebral discs degenerate, and the annulus fibrosus can crack as the nucleus pulposus begins to dehydrate. The discs of older athletes are more rigid and less elastic, and the mobility of the spine is limited. On the other hand, as the viscous gel of the nucleus pulposus gradually dehydrates, it becomes less likely that it will be displaced and compress against the nerve. In comparison, disc herniation in a young person involves the movement of a greater amount of the gelatinous fluid of the nucleus pulposus, causing more compression, pain, and incapacity of the neural elements. Disc herniation therefore occurs more frequently with young athletes.

The Basics Of Body Building

The Basics Of Body Building

Bodybuilding is the process of developing muscle fibers through various techniques. It is achieved through muscle conditioning, weight training, increased calorie intake, and resting your body as it repairs and heals itself, before restarting your workout routine.

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Responses

  • Kristian
    What causes peroneus longus and peroneus brevis muscles pain?
    6 years ago
  • Joann
    How to stretch peroneus brevis?
    6 years ago
  • kacie
    Where is the pubic symphysis?
    5 years ago
  • daisy
    How to use the pinky toe to make my peroneus brevis muscle bigger?
    5 years ago
  • roderic
    What nerves are used in the squat?
    5 years ago
  • Bryan
    Can you squat with peroneus brevis injury?
    4 years ago
  • Itala
    What muscle is stretched in a squat?
    10 months ago

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